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A FOCUS ON HEALING SPEED

 Regarding the speed of healing in a patient, there are two very important aspects to take into account. The first aspect is how the patient feels about a given situation, and the second one consists of the steps taken to heal.

Regarding the speed of healing in a patient, there are two very important aspects to take into account. The first aspect is how the patient feels about a given situation, and the second one consists of the steps taken to heal.


Stress slows the healing process, as was proven by many studies and particularly noted in “The influence of anger expression on wound healing”, a study linked below. This randomized clinical trial proves that a rise in cortisol, a hormone secreted in a person’s body due to stress, leads to slower healing speed. This means that if a patient feels agitated about their treatment or medical condition, they are likely to heal slower. It also points to the idea that stress from the emergency room causes a possibility of slower healing in the future. Also taking into account frustration (a very human response to disfavorable and consistent situations), slow healing speed could increase stress and create a vicious cycle. This proves that patient care is extremely important to the long-term healing time for a patient, and good patient care could shorten the journey.


Relating to the journey, steps taken to heal are also very important in ensuring that a patient will actually do so. To recover, patients need to take their medicines, but the problem is some don’t. It’s referred to as medication nonadherence when a person does not take their medications, and this can lead to a slower healing time as well. This is because a medication is given to a patient to help them heal (and for some medications, stay alive), and if a patient doesn’t take their medications, they skip out on that aid.



In a way, the healing process with and without medication can be depicted as going to the park. With medication, the ride to the park is on a bicycle, scooter, or a preferred choice to aid in getting to the park faster. Different medications can also usually be offered, so a switch from a bike to a car is possible. Without medication, the journey to the park is longer, because the only option is to walk. Unless for some reason a person turns to go back home, they will get to the park, only slower. A healing journey is the same as that walk to the park, slower without the prescribed medication that 60% of people forget to take (linked below under “People Don’t Take Their Pills. Only One Thing Seems to Help”). A reminder could be useful for these people, especially if the doctor recommends setting one somewhere.


In sum, healing time is complicated, but with less stress and good reminders, the road to a quick recovery is in sight.












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